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Kal's basement Home Theatre/Bar/Brewery build 2.0
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kal
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Joined: 06 Mar 2006
Posts: 16751
Location: Ottawa, Canada

TV/Projector: JVC DLA-RS56


PostLink    Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


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Ok, interesting. So that's why it's only used in the one spot I guess. Thanks!

Kal

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My basement/HT/bar/brewery build 2.0
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Ile




Joined: 09 Mar 2006
Posts: 1491
Location: Jyväskylä, Finland


PostLink    Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Starting tiling from walls is other option, then you don't have to wait that floor dry before starting walls and no need for shielding ready floor from splatters and dropping tiles. Very Happy One dropped tile could crack already installed floor tile and knows extra work.

I make walls first, except bottom row that will be made after floor as a compensation row. I use leveled guides for second row where I start walls.

kal wrote:
Maybe it's because the material the tile is attached to isn't continuous? On the slightly sloped shower floor on the left the tile is attached to the Schulter foam shower tray resting on concrete, and on the flat floor to the right the tile is attached to a plywood backer/platon that is screwed to the foundation. Over time there may be subtle shifting between the two which may cause cracking in the grout, so an expansion joint is used instead.

But then why only on the one side? Shouldn't it be on all 4 sides? Schluter makes movement joints for just about any application (corner, wall/floor transitions, etc). I would have expected to see it (or a similar product) all around if it was used in one spot. You can't have shifting on one side but not the other. Tiles don't stretch. If they did, you wouldn't need an expansion joint. Wink

Kal
It's there because they know foundation will have movement because it's made over different materials.
I guess they will use silicon sealant between walls and floor, that work as a movement joint for other seams.
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kal
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

TV/Projector: JVC DLA-RS56


PostLink    Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ile wrote:
Starting tiling from walls is other option, then you don't have to wait that floor dry before starting walls and no need for shielding ready floor from splatters and dropping tiles. Very Happy One dropped tile could crack already installed floor tile and knows extra work.

True. One issue however with this Shluter foam floor is that it's somewhat fragile. They put plywood or cement board temporarily over it when they were walking on it to waterproof the shower wall. They're doing the wall today and may be using something now to keep junk off the floor.

They tend to be fairly clean working I've noticed. They did the brewery floor first and then the wall and there was zero splatter. They're doing the same in the bathroom now: Floors first and then they're going to work their way right up the wall with the tile.

Quote:
I make walls first, except bottom row that will be made after floor as a compensation row. I use leveled guides for second row where I start walls.

That sounds like more work no? How do you stop the second row from sagging if there's nothing underneath?

Quote:
I guess they will use silicon sealant between walls and floor, that work as a movement joint for other seams.

I'm not sure. We'll have to see. I noticed the other way that our master bathroom tiled shower has clear silicone along all the corners where walls meet. I guess it's the things I'm thinking about all the time now. Wink

Kal

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kal
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Joined: 06 Mar 2006
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

TV/Projector: JVC DLA-RS56


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The back wall of the shower was completed today. There's a floor to ceiling niche that will have 3-4 glass shelves for shampoo/soap/etc that has a special mosaic tile.



Close-up of the mosaic tile:



Originally the shower niche was going to be on the left side near where shower controls and head would be, but due to varous framing reasons it ended up on the right side. This is actually probably a good thing as less water in the niche means less cleaning, less standing water, and so on.

Floor to ceiling shower niches seem to be uncommon. Normally you'd have a little 12-18" high cubby hole somewhere. When the drywall hangers were working we happened to be walking by and noticed that they had installed cement board completely over the niche. I guess they saw a few studs close together and figured it was just standard wall framing (even though there was a plywood backer).

That's the one thing I've really noticed with this project that seems to have a lot 'special' things. You have a lot of trades coming and going and they're used to doing the same thing over and over again and will often miss things that are non-standard. It just means that project oversight needs to more vigilent.

Another example:

Number of trades that have commented on the "stage" (aka riser) in the home theater and asked where the stripper pole was going: 5 (and counting, including the city inspector)

No joke. I'm almost tempted to install one so that they stop asking. And then start charging for admission. "Gentlemen put your hands together for the lovely Kal ...".

Hanging upside down from the pole would probably be good for my back & herniated disc.

Kal

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Ile




Joined: 09 Mar 2006
Posts: 1491
Location: Jyväskylä, Finland


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
How do you stop the second row from sagging if there's nothing underneath?

There is used leveled plank below second row.

With big tiles like your this is more work, but with smaller tiles it's faster to use guide than try to get first rows top plane straight with tilted floor.

kal wrote:
One issue however with this Shluter foam floor is that it's somewhat fragile. They put plywood or cement board temporarily over it when they were walking on it to waterproof the shower wall. They're doing the wall today and may be using something now to keep junk off the floor.

It's same with rolled moisture barrier it's fragile. If walls are done first only those are rolled. Floor treatment are done when walls are ready, same time screw holes for guide planks are treated.
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kal
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

TV/Projector: JVC DLA-RS56


PostLink    Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Realstone wall in the bathroom was installed yesterday:







It's Realstone "Mocha honed":

http://www.realstonesystems.com/natural-stone-products-thin-stone-veneer-collection-mocha.php

It's a new product of theirs. Unlike most ReadStone panels the thicknesses of the slivers vary on this one so you have to make a design choice when you start: Install them all in the same orientation and do more cuts to avoid an overly consistent look in the corners, or flip some from time to time and end up with non-continuous horizontal lines. We went with horizontal lines that are straight & more cuts.

They still have to do the bottom row and above the door. Then the opposite vanity wall gets tiled about 1/3 of the way up.

Kal

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jask




Joined: 17 Mar 2006
Posts: 9565
Location: kamloops BC


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is looking great Kal. The Realstone looks great but will the shower overspray it?
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kal
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Joined: 06 Mar 2006
Posts: 16751
Location: Ottawa, Canada

TV/Projector: JVC DLA-RS56


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jask wrote:
That is looking great Kal. The Realstone looks great but will the shower overspray it?

The shower head's a good 6 feet away on the opposite wall so it wasn't much of a concern. The Realstone is more in the 'entrance' to the shower. They seemed more concerned with the possibility of having to clean soap scum off of it.

There's cement board behind the Realstone but no Schluter waterproofing membrane other than at the corner and floor edges. The glue they used to attach the Realstone is waterproof once cured, meant for external all-weather use. (I was curious and checked the label). Wink

Kal

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jask




Joined: 17 Mar 2006
Posts: 9565
Location: kamloops BC


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Soap scum was my thought as well..... I wouldn't want the job of cleaning that surface, will it be sealed?
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kal
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Joined: 06 Mar 2006
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

TV/Projector: JVC DLA-RS56


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jask wrote:
Soap scum was my thought as well..... I wouldn't want the job of cleaning that surface, will it be sealed?

I'm not sure. I'll see what they have planned as it moves towards finishing. If you seal one area you'd have to seal the whole thing I'd imagine as it would probably look different (?).

Kal

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jask




Joined: 17 Mar 2006
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Location: kamloops BC


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes... you could single coat the entire wall and do 2-3 coats in the shower area. I would mask and use a sprayer to apply the sealer and follow with a dry brush to wipe off any puddles or drips. A couple friends and some beer and it would take no time working on 4ft sections. Most sealers will also enhance/darken the colour of the stone.
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zaphod




Joined: 16 Jun 2006
Posts: 2002
Location: Cloverdale


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

most sealers will also enhance the effect of the beer...

(masks are your friend)

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jask




Joined: 17 Mar 2006
Posts: 9565
Location: kamloops BC


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

zaphod wrote:
most sealers will also enhance the effect of the beer...

(masks are your friend)


SSsssh!! Laughing
seriously though, lots of the newer products are low VOC Wink
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zaphod




Joined: 16 Jun 2006
Posts: 2002
Location: Cloverdale


PostLink    Posted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i'm real susceptible to solvent off gassing. makes me higher than a kite. The replaced the carpet tiles at work and used "water based no smell glue" and the only one to get a buzz was me. not a huge buzz, but still...

i remember one February in Ontario stripping the paint from afloor inmy Victorian (4" wide fir that was under battleship lino and had been sealed with red paint) before i varathaned it.

Before i started i arranged a floor sander rental, but at some point i realized that there was no way I could get the sander in my condition (bombed from the fumes). I called them back and said

Quote:
HISH I RNT SANDER. CANT KESHD IT. BYSSHHH. <click>


I think they understood.

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kal
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

TV/Projector: JVC DLA-RS56


PostLink    Posted: Thu Aug 16, 2012 3:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tiling is now 100% done. The grout lines have been cleaned and grouting has started.

Bathroom:



Bar/Brewery:




We've signed off on the fine wood work/cabinetry after looking at various wood samples and stains. We're going with walnut stained to look slightly grey, but not too dark to hide the interesting grain that walnut is known for.

Below are a few rough layout sketches that were used mostly for estimating purposes.

Window framing made of solid wood between bar & brewery, front of bar:



Top view of bar:



The bar taps and drip tray go along the left wall.
All of the bar cabinetry will be flat surface/simple, likely with pulls along the tops.

Fireplace wall:



At the bottom of the stairs is a barn style sliding door on the right:



On the left is a hinge door with blum hinges for access to the storage area under the stairs. It's also the 'head end' area where the phone/internet/cable/satellite come in and are distributed.

The fireplace wall, bar front, and sliding door have an aluminum insert as per the diagrams above. Below is a mock-up that was done to show us the general idea:



Not shown are the A/V rack for the home theater, the DVD shelves, or the riser steps and nosing. The riser steps will appear floating so legs have now been picked as well to go underneath:




The bathroom vanity has arrived on site. We weren't sure if we'd end up with a custom job some something pre-built. Lots of options were looked at and we ended up with a Ginza 42 Smoked Ash vanity from Art Bathe (a pre-built unit that comes complete with cabinets, quartz counter top, faucet, sink, and mirror):




The painter comes Friday to do some sanding and put on a first coat of paint. Everything has been mapped out for him.

Wall paint colours:



Ceiling paint colours:



Kal

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kal
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Joined: 06 Mar 2006
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

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PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 12:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We're looking for a small bench to go in the bathroom niche and are having problems finding one that fits.

The opening is only 35.25" wide and most benches seem to be much larger than that. Anyone seen a bench that is somewhat contemporary/modern that would fit in that space?

Here are some pictures of the styles we like (but are all too big to fit in the 35.25" wide space):















It appears we like slat benches. Many appear to be knockoffs or at least inspired by the George Nelson platform bench that he first introduced in 1946:



Free beer to anyone who can find one that fits in a 35.25" space.

Kal

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garyfritz




Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 11368
Location: Fort Collins, CO


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hah! I like the paint color: "Utterly Beige." Laughing
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ecrabb
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Joined: 13 Mar 2006
Posts: 15909
Location: Utah

TV/Projector: JVC RS40, Epson 5010


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know, Gary... My whole house was painted with Sherwin-Williams, and I actually have that color somewhere in my house... I think it's our master hallway and master bath. Looks great with slate.

It also reminds me of one of my old favorite songs, "Intense Beige" by the Judybats. One of the lines is the chorus is, "I love you anyway... You're an intense beige, but that's okay..."

Kal, if I were you, I'd try to pick one of the less expensive versions of the bench that you like, and just take it to somebody to modify it for you. Something like this bench would be easy to cut down a little:



Take the legs off, cut the wood, refinish the end, re-attach the legs, and bada bing bada boom, custom-fit bench.

SC
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kal
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PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's not a bad idea SC. I'll keep it in mind!

Kal

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kal
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

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PostLink    Posted: Sun Aug 26, 2012 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First coat of final paint was done:



Cedar in the sauna was installed:





Complete details on the sauna can be found in an older post here.
They did a great job cutting/installing the cedar. In fact, they did a better job than the instructions as they were able to hide all of the bench screws completely. Nice and clean. All that's left is installation of the Tylo heater and a small strip of cedar along along the bottom to act as a baseboard.


Vanity, urinal, and toilet were installed and plumbing done:




We decided that a single layer of 1/2" plywood on the riser wasn't enough so an extra layer of 5/8" T&G OSB was installed on top:




The brewery sink and vent hood were installed:





Kal

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